Augmented Reality House

A screen grab from the AR project

A screen grab from the AR project

The idea: 

"A cranky old ghost who wants you off his lawn" That was the basic idea and I wanted a creature made of candy bars. 

Process

The first issue I had to figure out was how to get AR to lock on a large structure. I tested a few different ways and ended up just increasing the scale of the object target.  

The target image is designed to scan in small objects like toys. I figured if I just increased the size of the target I could scan in a larger object. I made 4 different sizes of the target and ended up using the largest one shown here.

The target image is designed to scan in small objects like toys. I figured if I just increased the size of the target I could scan in a larger object. I made 4 different sizes of the target and ended up using the largest one shown here.

The AR is triggered by the tin flower decoration on the front porch. 

 

Audio:

I came up with the script with the help of my son and recorded the voice, basically yelling into a microphone. I put the audio file into Adobe Audition and added filters, changed pitch and speed. 

Animation:

The animation was created in 3DS Max with a very low resolution character using morph targets for the mouth phonemes. 

Originally the character had big eyes, but the particle movement made the eyes hard to read, so i removed the eyes and used a bag of candy for the pupil. The pupils were originally bags of Doritos and Fritos, but the character says he's made of candy, so I changed them to bags of candy. 

The candy motion is derived from a particle system that sticks to the characters animation. Secondary motion was added by letting the velocity of the characters movement to add to the particle coordinates. 

Once everything looks OK, I had way too many particle to run in an AR project. I ended up attaching 3 or 4 candy bars together in a cluster and spun them around the group's center.  This way I could reduce the particle count by about 3X.

Then I tested, tested, and tested again to make sure everything would run smoothly and line up. 

To keep a high frame rate, a simple texture was used with a normal map (derived from a grayscale bump map) and used on all teh candy bars. 

The wrappers and the bump map that was converted to a normal map in Unity.

The wrappers and the bump map that was converted to a normal map in Unity.

Along the way I fought with C# scripting and other technical headaches that popped up during production. The entire process took about a month. I am currently makeing a course on AR production for Pluralsight.com so the entire process will be explained in detail in that course. If you have any questions, feel free to contact me at richfiore01@gmail .com

Happy Halloween!